Taxing A Child's Investment Income



Some children who receive investment income are required to file a tax return and pay tax on at least a portion of that income (and possibly at the parents' marginal tax rate). This is often referred to as the kiddie tax. The kiddie tax cannot be computed accurately until the parents' income is known. Thus, the child's return may have to be extended until the parents' return has been completed. Additionally, if the parents' return is amended or adjusted upon IRS audit, the child's return could require correction (assuming the changes to the parental return affect the tax bracket). If a child cannot file his or her own tax return for any reason, such as age, the child's parent or guardian is responsible for filing a return on the child's behalf.

There are tax rules that affect how parents report a child's investment income. Investment income normally includes interest, dividends, capital gains, and other unearned income, such as from a trust. Some parents can include their child's investment income on their tax return. Other children may have to file their own tax return. Special rules apply if a child's total investment income is more than $2,000. Finally, the parents' tax rate may apply to part of that income instead of the child's tax rate.

Note: Higher income individuals subject to the 3.8% net investment income tax (3.8% NIIT) may benefit from shifting income to and having their child claim investment income on the child's tax return. This may be advantageous because the child receives his or her own $200,000 exclusion from the 3.8% NIIT.

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