Expenses Qualifying for the Child Care Credit



Working parents can find summer child care solutions challenging. However, a nonrefundable credit is available if the qualifying child care expense is incurred so that you (and your spouse, if married) can work. The maximum credit is 20%-35% (depending on your adjusted gross income) of the lesser of (1) your qualifying child care expenses up to $3,000 for one and $6,000 for two qualifying individuals or (2) your earned income (or your spouse's, if less).

Qualified child care expenses provide for the well-being and protection of a dependent child under age 13 and must be reduced by the amount of any employer-provided dependent care benefits. Amounts paid for food and education generally are not considered work-related expenses; however, services that are incidental to and cannot be separated from the costs of caring for a child are not excluded from the credit. Therefore, expenses paid to a day care center are usually eligible for the credit, whereas summer school or tutoring expenses are not. The cost of day camp should qualify for the credit; however, overnight camps are not considered work-related and don't qualify.

If you pay someone to come to your home and care for your dependent child, you may be a household employer required to withhold and pay Social Security and Medicare tax and pay federal unemployment taxes. Keep these rules in mind as you plan summer child care.

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